Faith vs. Works; Catholics vs. Protestants

One of the interesting things about reading religious history is what people fought over.  One of the biggest splits in Christianity occurred in the 1500s.  Those who split from the Catholic Church are called Protestants.  There were a number of reasons why these two groups split.  One of them had to do with indulgences.  If you sinned, you could buy an indulgent from a Catholic priest or pope and your sin would be forgiven.  Martin Luther, the founder of the protestant (protest) movement was totally against this and his ideas on works and faith fueled the split.  One of the ideas that Luther had was that no one earned their salvation–it was by the grace of God.  This theology is called Justification by Faith (not works).  Luther expounded on this issue in a work called On the Freedom of a Christian Man.  If you want to read it you can find it here.  He wrote this in 1520.  Below are some highlights on what he thought about doing good works and faith (I’ve done the underlining and bolding).  On starting this treatise, he put forth the following propositions:

"A Christian man is the most free lord of all, and subject to none; a Christian man is the most dutiful servant of all, and subject to every one."

Luther then gives his biblical reasons for believing this:

Although these statements appear contradictory, yet, when they are found to agree together, they will do excellently for my purpose. They are both the statements of Paul himself, who says, "Though I be free from all men, yet have I made myself a servant unto all" (I Cor. ix. 19), and "Owe no man anything but to love one another" (Rom. xiii. 8). Now love is by its own nature dutiful and obedient to the beloved object. Thus even Christ, though Lord of all things, was yet made of a woman; made under the law; at once free and a servant; at once in the form of God and in the form of a servant.

Luther believed that Christ was both free and at the same time a servant.  Luther then uses these biblical phrases to clarify what the inner man (the soul) and the outer man (the flesh) has to do with being at the same time free and a servant, and thus he forms his ideas on justification by faith.  As you can see below, the inner man is free and the outer man is a servant, in the same way that Christ is both free and a servant. 

We first approach the subject of the inward man, that we may see by what means a man becomes justified, free, and a true Christian; that is, a spiritual., new, and inward man. It is certain that absolutely none among outward things, under whatever name they may be reckoned, has any influence in producing Christian righteousness or liberty, nor, on the other hand, unrighteousness or slavery. This can be shown by an easy argument.

What can it profit to the soul that the body should be in good condition, free, and full of life; that it should eat, drink, and act according to its pleasure; when even the most impious slaves of every kind of vice are prosperous in these matters? Again, what harm can ill-health, bondage, hunger, thirst, or any other outward evil, do to the soul, when even the most pious of men, and the freest in the purity of their conscience, are harassed by these things? Neither of these states of things has to do with the liberty or the slavery of the soul.

And so it will profit nothing that the body should be adorned with sacred vestments, or dwell in holy places, or be occupied in sacred offices, or pray, fast, and abstain from certain meats, or do whatever works can be done through the body and in the body. Something widely different will be necessary for the justification and liberty of the soul, since the things I have spoken of can be done by an impious person, and only hypocrites are produced by devotion to these things. On the other hand, it will not at all injure the soul that the body should be clothed in profane raiment, should dwell in profane places, should eat and drink in the ordinary fashion, should not pray aloud, and should leave undone all the things above mentioned, which may be done by hypocrites.

And — to cast everything aside — even speculations, meditations, and whatever things can be performed by the exertions of the soul itself, are of no profit. One thing, and one alone, is necessary for life, justification, and Christian liberty; and that is the most holy word of God, the Gospel of Christ, as He says, "I am the resurrection and the life; he that believeth in Me shall not die eternally" (John xi. 25), and also, "If the Son shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed" (John viii. 36), and, "Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God" (Matt. iv. 4).

Let us therefore hold it for certain and firmly established that the soul can do without everything except the word of God, without which none at all of its wants are provided for. But, having the word, it is rich and wants for nothing, since that is the word of life, of truth, of light, of peace, of justification, of salvation, of joy, of liberty, of wisdom, of virtue, of grace, of glory, and of every good thing. It is on this account that the prophet in a whole Psalm (Psalm cxix.), and in many other places, sighs for and calls upon the word of God with so many groanings and words. . . .

But you will ask, What is this word, and by what means is it to be used, since there are so many words of God? I answer, The Apostle Paul (Rom. I.) explains what it is, namely the Gospel of God, concerning His Son, incarnate, suffering, risen, and glorified through the spirit, the Sanctifier. To preach Christ is to feed the soul, to justify it, to set it free, and to save it, if it believes the preaching. For faith alone, and the efficacious use of the word of God, bring salvation. "If thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved" (Rom. x. 9); and again, "Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth" (Rom. x. 4), and "The just shall live by faith" (Rom. I. 17). For the word of God cannot be received and honored by any works but by faith alone. Hence it is clear that as the soul needs the word alone for life and justification, so it is justified by faith alone, and not by any works. For if it could be justified by any other means, it would have no need of the word, nor consequently of faith.

But this faith cannot consist all with works; that is, if you imagine that you can be justified by those works, whatever they are, along with it. For this would be to halt between two opinions, to worship Baal, and to kiss the hand to him, which is a very great iniquity, as Job says. Therefore, when you begin to believe, you learn at the same time that all that is in you is utterly guilty, sinful, and damnable, according to that saying, "All have sinned, and come short of the glory of God" (Rom. iii. 23), and also: "There is none righteous, no, not one; they are all gone out of the way; they are together become unprofitable: there is none that doeth good, no, not one" (Rom. iii. 10-12). When you have learnt this, you will know that Christ is necessary for you, since He has suffered and risen again for you, that, believing on Him, you might by this faith become another man, all your sins being remitted, and you being justified by the merits of another, namely Christ alone.

Since then this faith can reign only in the inward man, as it is said, "With the heart man believeth unto righteousness" (Rom. x. 10); and since it alone justifies, it is evident that by no outward work or labor can the inward man be at all justified, made free, and saved; and that no works whatever have any relation to him. And so, on the other hand, it is solely by impiety and incredulity of heart that he become guilty and a slave of sin, deserving condemnation, not by any outward sin or work. Therefore the first care of every Christian ought to be to lay aside all reliance on works, and strengthen his faith alone more and more, and by it grow in the knowledge, not of works, but of Christ Jesus, who has suffered and risen again for him, as Peter teaches (I Peter v.) when he makes no other work to be a Christian one. Thus Christ, when the Jews asked Him what they should do that they might work the works of God, rejected the multitude of works; with which He saw that they were puffed up, and commanded them one thing only, saying, "This is the work of God: that ye believe on Him whom He hath sent, for Him hath God the Father sealed" (John vi. 27, 29).

But you ask how it can be the fact that faith alone justifies, and affords without works so great a treasure of good things, when so many works, ceremonies, and laws are prescribed to us in the Scripture. I answer: before all things bear in mind what I have said, that faith alone without works justifies, sets free, and saves. . . .

Let it suffice to say this concerning the inner man and its liberty, and concerning that righteousness of faith, which needs neither laws nor good work; nay, they are even hurtful to it, if any one pretends to be justified by them.

 

So that is what Luther has to say about the inner man (the soul).  Nothing can save the soul except faith alone.  But does that mean that man is not commanded to do good works?  Absolutely not, according to Luther.  But there is a method to do good works that involves a total belief in Christ.  He states:

And now let us turn to the other part: to the outward man. Here we shall give an answer to all those who, taking offense at the word of faith and at what I have asserted, say, "If faith does everything, and by itself suffices for justification, why then are good works commanded? Are we then to take our ease and do no works, content with faith?"  Not so, impious men, I reply; not so. That would indeed really be the case, if we were thoroughly and completely inner and spiritual persons; but that will not happen until the last day, when the dead shall be raised. As long as we live in the flesh, we are but beginning and making advances in that which shall be completed in a future life. On this account the Apostle calls that which we have in this life the first-fruits of the Spirit (Rom. viii. 23). In future we shall have the tenths, and the fullness of the Spirit. To this part belongs the fact I have stated before: that the Christian is the servant of all and subject of all. For in that part in which he is free he does no works, but in that in which he is a servant he does all works. Let us see on what principle this is so.

Although, as I have said, inwardly, and according to the spirit, a man is amply enough justified by faith, having all that he requires to have, except that this very faith and abundance ought to increase from day to day, even till the future life, still he remains in this mortal life upon earth, in which it is necessary that he should rule his own body and have intercourse with men. Here then works begin; here he must not take his ease; here he must give heed to exercise his body by fastings, watchings, labor, and other regular discipline, so that it may be subdued to the spirit, and obey and conform itself to the inner man and faith, and not rebel against them nor hinder them, as is its nature to do if it is not kept under. For the inner man, being conformed to God and created after the image of God through faith, rejoices and delights itself in Christ, in whom such blessings have been conferred on it, and hence has only this task before it: to serve God with joy and for nought in free love.

But in doing this he comes into collision with that contrary will in his own flesh, which is striving to serve the world and to see its own gratification. This the spirit of faith cannot and will not bear, but applies itself with cheerfulness and zeal to keep it down and restrain it, as Paul says, "I delight in the law of God after the inward man; but I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin" (Rom. vii. 22, 23), and again, "I keep under my body, and bring it into subjection lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway" (I Cor. ix. 27), and "They that are Christ’s have crucified the flesh, with the affections and lusts" (Gal. v. 24).

These works, however, must not be done with any notion that by them a man can be justified before God — for faith, which alone is righteousness before God, will not bear with this false notion — but solely with this purpose: that the body may be brought into subjection, and be purified from its evil lusts, so that our eyes may be turned only to purging away those lusts. For when the soul has been cleansed by faith and made to love God, it would have all things to be cleansed in like manner, and especially its own body, so that all things might unite with it in the love and praise of God. Thus it comes that, from the requirements of his own body, a man cannot take his ease, but is compelled on its account to do many good works, that he many bring it into subjection. yet these works are not the means of his justification before God; he does them out of disinterested love to the service of God; looking to no other end than to do what is well-pleasing to Him whom he desires to obey most dutifully in all things.

Since then works justify no man, but a man must be justified before he can do any good work, it is most evident that it is faith alone which, but the mere mercy of God through Christ, and by means of His word, can worthily and sufficiently justify and save the person; and that a Christian man needs no work, no law, for his salvation; for by faith he is free from all law, and in perfect freedom does gratuitously all that he does, seeking nothing either of profit or of salvation — since by the grace of God he is already saved and rich in all things through his faith — but solely that which is well-pleasing to God.

So, too, no good work can profit an unbeliever to justification and salvation; and, on the other hand, no evil work makes him an evil and condemned person, but that unbelief, which makes the person and the tree bad, makes his works evil and condemned. Wherefore, when any man is good or bad, this does not arise from his works, but from his faith or unbelief, as the wise man says, "The beginning of sin is to fall away from God"; that is, not to believe. Paul says, "He that cometh to God must believe" (Heb. xi. 6): and Christ says the same thing: "Either make the tree good, and his fruit good, or else make the tree corrupt, and his fruit corrupt" (Matt. xii. 33)  — as much as to say, He who wishes to have good fruit will begin with the tree, and plant a good one; even so he who wishes to do good work must begin, not by working, but by believing, since it is this which makes the person good. For nothing makes the person good but faith, nor bad but unbelief. . . .

From all this it is easy to perceive on what principle good works are to be cast aside or embraced, and by what rule all teachings put forth concerning works are to be understood. For if works are brought forward as grounds of justification, and are done under false persuasion that we can pretend to be justified by them, they lay on us the yoke of necessity, and extinguish liberty along with faith, and by this very addition to their use they become no longer good, but really worthy of condemnation. For such works are not free, but blaspheme the grace of God, to which alone it belongs to justify and save through faith. Works cannot accomplish this, and yet, with impious presumption, through our folly, they take it upon themselves to do so; and thus break in with violence upon the office and glory of grace.

We do not then reject good works; nay we embrace them and teach them in the highest degree. It is not on their own account that we condemn them, but on account of this impious addition to them and the perverse notion of seeking justification by them. These things cause them to be only good in outward show, but in reality not good, since by them men are deceived and deceive others, like ravening wolves in sheep’s clothing .

Lastly we will speak also of those works which he performs towards his neighbor. For man does not live for himself alone in this mortal body, in order to work on its account, but also for all men on earth; nay, he lives only for others, and not for himself. For it is to this end that he brings his own body into subjection, that he may be able to serve others more sincerely and more freely, as Paul says, "None of us liveth to himself, and no man dieth to himself. For whether we live, we live unto the Lord; and whether we die, we die unto the Lord" (Rom. xiv. 7, 8). Thus it is impossible that he should take his ease in this life, and not work for the good of his neighbors, since he must needs speak, act, and converse among men, just as Christ was made in the likeness of men and found in fashion as a man, and had His conservation among men.

Yet a Christian has need of none of these things for justification and salvation, but in all his works he ought to entertain this view and look only to this object — that he may serve and be useful to others in all that he does; having nothing before his eyes but the necessities and the advantage of his neighbor. Thus the Apostle commands us to work with our own hands, that we may have to give to those that need. He might have said, that we may support ourselves; but he tells us to give to those that need. It is the part of a Christian to take care of his own body for the very purpose that, by its soundness and well-being, he may be enable to labor, and to acquire and preserve property, for the aid of those who are in want, that thus the stronger member may serve the weaker member, and we may be children of God, thoughtful and busy one for another, bearing one another’s burdens, and so fulfilling the law of Christ.

 

Thus, when Paul had taught the Philippians how they had been made rich by that faith in Christ in which they had obtained all things, he teaches them further in these words: "If there be therefore any consolation in Christ, if any comfort of love, in any fellowship of the Spirit, if any bowels and mercies, fulfill ye my joy, that ye be like-minded, having the same love, being of one accord, of one mind. Let nothing be done through strife or vainglory; but in lowliness of mind let each esteem other better than himself. Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others" (Phil. ii. 1-4).

In this we see clearly that the Apostle lays down this rule for a Christian life: that all our works should be directed to the advantage of others, since every Christian has such abundance through his faith that all his other works and his whole life remain over and above wherewith to serve and benefit his neighbor of spontaneous goodwill. . . .

 

Luckily for us, Luther also wrote a work called A Treatise on Good Works, which can be found here.  Maybe at some later point I will spend some time going through what Luther meant as ‘good works.’

However, I bring all of this up because of a discussion that occurred the other day on whether or not Christ had any interest in making the world a better place, or whether Christians had any interest in making the world a better place.  The answer, I see, ultimately comes from whether or not you are a Protestant or a Catholic or something else.  For Luther, a man, as a servant, is required to do good works, as long as they are done in the right spirit which first of all requires that you believe in Christ.

The words ‘good works’ and ‘making the world a better place’, to me, are the same.  If one feeds the poor, then they are doing a good thing for the world and making it better.  For Luther, one only feeds the poor because they believe in Christ and that is what Christ did as a servant.  If someone who follows the Protestant way of thinking, feeds the poor but does not have faith in Jesus, then what they are doing is a bad work.  All that matters is the belief in Christ and salvation.  For Luther, doing something has no effect on salvation–it is only the belief in Christ that matters.   To the Protestant Christian who follows Luther, this is not making the world a better place.  The world is something else, Christ is everything.  Everything they do is for God.  However, the poor get fed either way.  That, I think, is making the world better. 

There is a fundamental difference in thinking here but for me the division isn’t that great.  One person believes he isn’t interested in making the world a better place, and another thinks that by his actions he is trying to make the world a better place (although here the definition of ‘better’ could also be debated).  The difference is on words, but the outcomes could be the same. 

 

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2 Responses to Faith vs. Works; Catholics vs. Protestants

  1. Rob says:

    Wow, it this a lesson plan or a blog post.  The sad part is that you\’ve probably put more work and thought into this post than most christians have put into their "faith".  I was raised Lutheran and it probably helped me escape religion.  I came to the conclusion that if a god would condemn someone to hell who spent their lives doing good work, but wasn\’t to sure about if or what god – then god was a real prick.  I\’d also have to say that I agree with the sentiment that faith, without works, is dead.  Considering the varied circumstances throughout time and location, you can\’t objectively set forth any of these god-specific (faith) rules without unfairly condemning huge groups of people to hell.   Eventually I decided that heaven and hell are silly concepts and man is responsible for his own morality.  "The Golden Rule" as set in virtually every religion – or \’would I want someone else to treat me like this\’ seems to be about as good as it gets.
    (I hope this makes sense, I\’m on my first coffee this morning)

  2. Kevin says:

    Hey Rob!  Sorry if it sounded like a lesson plan!  I think part of my work escaped into this entry.  I was just reading through some early European history for a class I might teach (West. Civ. II) and I couldn\’t help but think of Luther and his ideas.   
    I think work is starting to show up more and more.  I\’ll be teaching a course on Race, Ethnicity and Immigration in the U.S. so I\’ve been thinking about that quite a bit. 
    The statement that Christ wasn\’t interested in making the world a better place just floored me.  I can\’t believe there is anyone out there who doesn\’t want a better world.  But reading Luther makes me realize that it is all about words and the way I see things!

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